Information Societies

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Posts Tagged ‘Digital Britain

Digital Britain forum

The Digital Britain summit

Watch live stream http://digitalbritainforum.org.uk/

Numerous links to blogs, including Write To Reply. Live Twitter feed @digitalbritain

Gordon Brown, Peter Mandelson, OFCOM, cable companies -all the players.

Written by iconpartnership

April 17, 2009 at 10:55 am

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Proposed Digital Rights Agency. Comment now.

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Lord Carter’s office have issued a proposal for the Digital Rights Agency referred to in the Digital Britain report. The consultation is open until 30th March.

WriteToReply have a site for you to comment on the proposal in detail.

You can download the proposal and read the press release from the Intellectual Property Office.

To comment go to http://writetoreply.org/strawman/

Written by iconpartnership

March 16, 2009 at 10:06 am

LSE students respond to Digital Britain

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London School of Economics MA students respond to Lord Carter via WriteToReply: http://bit.ly/uwhTq

Reminder: interface enhancement for reading long documents in a browser

Readability: a bookmarklet which strips the junk from web pages. Reclaim the web for reading  http://bit.ly/NaRbu

Don’t forget Tofu (Mac only). Reflows text in columns from any document, system-wide. Simple, improves quality of life http://bit.ly/zbNN

Written by iconpartnership

March 13, 2009 at 12:14 pm

Digital Britain: watch and listen

The Digital Britain report is open to comment until 12th March.

On 24th February NESTA hosted a conference on delivering Digital Britain. Many of the key players were present. Video and audio is now available.

It is an extraordinary opportunity to see the development of public policy enacted. Watch and listen.

NESTA delivering Digital Britain

I’ve seen Carter’s speech called ‘defensive’. Well, maybe. His central point though, is developing government policy: it is a report of government, not to government. Henceforth we will refer to ‘the Digital Britain report’, not ‘the Carter report’.

He summarises the report as covering three main areas: infrastructure, content and legal protection. Two further issues are the delivery of public services and a universal public service obligation for broadband. The widely criticised 2MB recommendation refers to a minimum standard for accessing public services, not a base level speed for internet access.

Throughout he is making the case for public intervention. A public policy framework is necessary for investment.

When he talks about content he is talking about television programming. The tactical / strategic distinction is about preserving some existing providers. Channel 4 is mentioned.

On legal protection (filesharing, DRM)  he says they have their ‘least formed ideas’ and are seeking engagement from other people.

Neil Berkett (Virgin Media) and Peter Bazalgette, (of Big Brother, Endemol fame) both ably represent their commercial interests. Bazalgette  repeats his view, heard in the recent BBC programme  Media Revolution (previous post) that tracking users’ viewing habits is a great opportunity for broadcasters and that legislation on product placement is a restrictive burden which should be removed. For overseas viewers: ‘knock heads together’ is just an expression.

Carter quotes a piece by Philip Stevens in the FT, in part to draw attention to an omission: the importance of public policy in developing next-generation infrastructure.

“On two things, everyone should be able to agree; first, the completion of the switchover to digital broadcasting in 2012 and the rapid advent of high-speed broadband transmission will overturn completely what remains of a broadcasting ecosystem created midway through the past century; second, high-quality news, current affairs, regional programming and home-grown drama and comedy will continue to demand substantial public subsidy.”

Financial Times

The rest is about what Stevens sees as the increasing monopoly power of the BBC.

Mark Thompson (BBC) wasn’t at NESTA.

Some context: as TV advertising revenues plummet due to recession and competition from the web, everyone in broadcasting wants a slice of the licence fee.

If it helps to visualise the different interests as personalities, try this

Public Service broadcasting in pictures

NESTA is the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts ‘a unique and independent body with a mission to make the UK more innovative.’

Written by iconpartnership

March 2, 2009 at 7:31 pm

Money Programme – Media Revolution: Tomorrow’s TV

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BBC’s Money programme available on iPlayer

Information Societies students should watch this. You may find examples for a blog post or presentation.

If you wonder why much broadcast TV seems formulaic, this programme explains why: it’s supposed to be, because the TV formula is an essential part of the business. A TV formula is valuable intellectual property, Who wants to be a millionaire? is a global brand.

This programme explains the importance of the formula in raising money and the reduced role of direct TV production funding as a proportion of costs. Charts the decline in TV ad revenues as advertisers migrate to the internet – down £100 million in a few years- and the appeal of internet distribution for advertisers and some programme makers.

Covers the usual broadcasters’ claim that file sharing distribution only represents lost revenue, and contrasts the internet-aware view that file sharing tells programme makers where there is a new audience and  new revenue opportunities.

Some sections of the industry look to targeted ads based on your viewing history as the future business model for programme makers. Also, introducing product placement (currently illegal under UK broadcast regulations, but legal for internet distribution). Others, and a majority of the viewing public, value public service funding as an important factor in the quality of UK programme making

The economic value of TV programming to the UK economy is clearly a major factor in the way the Carter report Digital Britain approaches copyright regulation. Programme makers and the public need to make their views known through the consultation process and MPs if the public interest in diverse and high quality programme making is to be protected by legislation.

Watch via iPlayer

Money Programme – Media Revolution: Tomorrow’s TV

Download Digital Britain report Download the report for print and offline reading

Comment on Digital Britain writetoreply.org

Your MP They work for you

Written by iconpartnership

February 20, 2009 at 12:55 pm

Get Carter

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Out-law.com reports:

‘The Government’s Digital Britain plan is a failure that gives favourable treatment to the music business and props up failed business models, a software trade body has said.

‘The Federation Against Software Theft and Investors in Software (FAST IiS), which promotes the legitimate use of software, has launched a stinging attack on the Digital Britain report and on the way the music industry has approached the threat of digital piracy.’
“The entertainment sector appear to have lobbied the Government to consider establishing a ‘pirates tax’ on all of us as well as yet another quango to oversee it, meaning more cost, and more hassle,” said FAST IiS chief executive John Lovelock.”

www.out-law.com

Written by iconpartnership

February 13, 2009 at 2:30 pm

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Comment on Digital Britain report

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Jack Schofield has a Guardian piece linking to a WordPress site which allows you to comment on the text of the Carter report. How excellent. We will.

http://writetoreply.org/digitalbritain/

Written by iconpartnership

February 5, 2009 at 11:26 pm